Just Released: Civil and Electrical Engineer Water Courses!

RedVector is happy to announce four mobile-ready civil engineering water courses, and one Hydroelectric Power Generation course for electrical engineers.  The first three courses in the list are video courses recorded in our Tampa studio, presented by none other than Mr. Alfredo Cely.  Mr. Cely is a Civil Engineer that has managed transportation, land development, water resources and aviation projects from planning to construction for the past 12 years. He is a licensed Civil Engineer in Florida, Texas, and Ecuador.

The course ‘Lead Contamination of Public Water Systems’ discusses the lead contamination in Flint, Michigan and how treatment technologies can be utilized to significantly limit the migration of lead into the potable water supply.

The course ‘Hydroelectric Power Generation’ explores how water flowing through dams produces power and is a perfect course for electrical engineers.

Rehabilitation of Water Distribution Systems: Current Technologies

The average age of water distribution systems within the U.S. is between 50 to 100 years. This is right in the design life cycle of many systems; thus local water agencies are investing more and more in the rehabilitation of existing water distribution systems instead of the construction of new systems. This interactive online course will go through the most current technologies to rehabilitate water distribution systems. At the end of this course Contractors, Engineers, Water System Operators, and Architects will be able to identify technologies that are used to repair, rehabilitate, and replace aging water distribution systems.

Rehabilitation of Water Distribution Systems: Selecting Rehab Methods

This interactive online course will go through the items that need to be considered when selecting a method to rehabilitate a water distribution system. At the end of this course Contractors, Engineers, Water System Operators, and Architects will be able to select applicable technologies to be used to repair, rehabilitate, and replace aging water distribution systems.

Rehabilitation of Water Distribution Systems: Designing Renewal Projects

This interactive online course will go through some of the key technical guidelines and standards for designing rehabilitation projects within the US. Some of these guidelines include AWWA, ANSI, ASTM and ASME standards. At the end of this course Contractors, Engineers, Water System Operators, and Architects will be able to determine the applicable design and QA/QC guidelines for common water distribution rehabilitation methods.

Lead Contamination of Public Water Systems

Lead contamination of drinking water is a major topic of concern across the country, particularly in areas with aging lead pipes. Lead contamination in Flint, Michigan; Washington, DC; and Newark, New Jersey, has focused attention on America’s decaying pipes. At least $384 billion of improvements are needed to maintain and replace essential parts of the country’s water infrastructure through 2030, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. While these improvements are underway, treatment technologies can be utilized to significantly limit the migration of lead into the potable water supply. This interactive online course will describe these technologies and opportunities for implementation.

Hydroelectric Power Generation

How does a dam produce energy? Is it really “clean” energy? This interactive online course presents key information regarding hydropower generation and technology that will be useful for technical personnel in the design, engineering, maintenance, and operations areas. Important information presented includes hydropower technology, environmental factors, wave and tidal hydro, trends in development, terms & facts, and notable hydropower sites. This course addresses critical factors that affect health, safety, and welfare of the population being served by hydropower generation.

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